Stille Wasser Tief Wasser

43 notes

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, James Franco, born 19 April 1978
Nine Quotes
Sometimes it is painful to be oneself; at other times it seems impossible to escape oneself.
Always have one artistic thing that is pure, at least one thing, where you don’t compromise. You can do other things to make money, but have one pure area.
I don’t even like to sleep - I feel as if there’s too much to do.
They say living well is the best revenge but sometimes writing well is even better.
I’m a huge Cormac McCarthy fan and have read every book of his.
Make your characters interested in something. Striving for something. In need of something. Good at something. This will make them likeable and interesting.
You also need love. Your characters need to love something, otherwise they will be unlovable.
There’s a tacit belief that actors shouldn’t write books, they’re sort of allowed to direct movies but there will be a lot of skepticism, and they shouldn’t do artwork or music. There are these invisible roadblocks to gain entree to these areas for actors, and you kind of have to crash through those invisible barriers.
You want to be interesting? Be interested.
Franco is an American actor, director, screenwriter, producer, teacher, author and poet. His books include Palo Alto, Actors Anonymous: A Novel, and A California Childhood. Franco has also written, directed and starred in several short plays, two of which — Fool’s Gold and The Ape — he adapted into feature-length films. He wrote and directed the film Good Time Max.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, James Franco, born 19 April 1978

Nine Quotes

  1. Sometimes it is painful to be oneself; at other times it seems impossible to escape oneself.
  2. Always have one artistic thing that is pure, at least one thing, where you don’t compromise. You can do other things to make money, but have one pure area.
  3. I don’t even like to sleep - I feel as if there’s too much to do.
  4. They say living well is the best revenge but sometimes writing well is even better.
  5. I’m a huge Cormac McCarthy fan and have read every book of his.
  6. Make your characters interested in something. Striving for something. In need of something. Good at something. This will make them likeable and interesting.
  7. You also need love. Your characters need to love something, otherwise they will be unlovable.
  8. There’s a tacit belief that actors shouldn’t write books, they’re sort of allowed to direct movies but there will be a lot of skepticism, and they shouldn’t do artwork or music. There are these invisible roadblocks to gain entree to these areas for actors, and you kind of have to crash through those invisible barriers.
  9. You want to be interesting? Be interested.

Franco is an American actor, director, screenwriter, producer, teacher, author and poet. His books include Palo Alto, Actors Anonymous: A Noveland A California Childhood. Franco has also written, directed and starred in several short plays, two of which — Fool’s Gold and The Ape — he adapted into feature-length films. He wrote and directed the film Good Time Max.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

42 notes

Women in digital media, I learned, are both under represented and less likely to receive credit for their work. Bell’s observation that “the new micro-institutions of journalism already bear the hallmarks of the restrictive heritage they abandoned with such glee” echoes what I discovered during nearly two years of counting and interviewing women involved in the new media landscape. Despite early prominence in digital journalism, female leaders are the minority in virtually all its corners today, and the women who do launch innovative publications aren’t getting the same attention as men. That has implications both practical and rhetorical, making journalism’s future seem as homogeneous as its past.
Women were digital media pioneers, but there’s still a gender gap there : Columbia Journalism Review (via becauseiamawoman)

(via becauseiamawoman)

16 notes

gettyimagesarchive:

Who we are | Lenny Hanson | In Focus

It’s not just our photographers that are helping to capture the world through photography; there are thousands of people working hard behind the scenes across the world to bring these images to you.

In this In Focus story, we get familiar with Lenny Hanson, Conservator at the Getty Images Hulton Archive in London. Lenny is one of the UK’s few specialists in photographic conservation.

Daguerreotype images from the 1800s are displayed in the Vintage Room of historic photographs in the Hulton Archive on May 13, 2011 in London, England. Photo by Oli Scarff

Black and white prints of Frank Sinatra are laid out from the vast collection of historic photographs stored in the Hulton Archive on May 13, 2011 in London, England. Photo by Oli Scarff

663 notes

Now I am quietly waiting for the catastrophe of my personality to seem beautiful again, and interesting, and modern.
Frank O’Hara, b. 3/27/1926, Meditations in an Emergency (via randomhouse)

16 notes

vintageanchorbooks:

"Tout pouvoir humain est un composé de patience et de temps."

(“All human power is a compound of time and patience.”)
—Eugénie Grandet (1833), by Honoré de Balzac

vintageanchorbooks:

"Tout pouvoir humain est un composé de patience et de temps."

(“All human power is a compound of time and patience.”)

—Eugénie Grandet (1833), by Honoré de Balzac

794 notes

the-final-sentence:

the-final-sentence:

March 6 - Gabriel García Márquez
Bio:  Born on March 6, 1928, writer Gabriel García Márquez grew up listening to family tales. After college, he became a journalist. His work introduced readers to magical realism, which combines fact and fantasy. His novels Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude) and El amor en los tiempos del cólera (Love in the Time of Cholera) have drawn worldwide audiences. He won a Nobel Prize in 1982. [2]
Anecdotes:
The highly political Marquez has long been a friend of Cuban president Fidel Castro. [3]
He claims that he wrote the book “One Hundred Years of Solitude” barricaded in his study in Mexico, after receiving a vision. One day, while he and his wife and children were in their car driving to Acapulco, he saw that he “had to tell [his] story the way his grandmother used to tell hers, and that [he] was to start from that afternoon in which a father took his child to discover ice.” He made an abrupt U-turn on the highway, the car never made it to Acapulco, and he locked himself in his study. Fifteen months later, he emerged with the manuscript, only to meet his wife holding a stack of bills. They traded papers, and she put the manuscript in the mail to his publisher. [4]
He has a yellow rose or tulip on his writing desk each day. [5]
When he was diagnosed with lymphatic cancer, he gamely declared to the world that the disease was an “enormous stroke of luck” because it finally forced him to write his memoirs. [6]
Final sentences:






‘Forever,’ he said.

from Love in the Time of Cholera (translated by Edith Grossman)











[He stumbled on the last step, but he got up at once. “He even took care to brush off the dirt that was stuck to his guts,” my Aunt Wene told me.] Then he went into his house through the back door that had been open since six and fell on his face in the kitchen.

from Chronicle of a Death Foretold











[And she, with a sad smile—which was already a smile of surrender to the impossible, the unreachable—said: “Yet you won’t remember anything during the day.” And she put her hands back over the lamp, her features darkened by a bitter cloud.] “You’re the only man who doesn’t remember anything of what he’s dreamed after he wakes up.

from Eyes of a Blue Dog (short story)

Only then did she understand that three thousand years had passed since the day she had had a desire to eat the first orange.

from Eva is Inside Her Cat (short story)

Before reaching the final line, however, he had already understood that he would never leave that room, for it was foreseen that the city of mirrors (or mirages) would be wiped out by the wind and exiled from the memory of men at the precise moment when Aureliano Babilonia would finish deciphering the parchments, and that everything written on them was unrepeatable since time immemorial and forever more, because races condemned to one hundred years of solitude did not have a second opportunity on earth.

from One Hundred Years of Solitude





Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

RIP Gabriel García Márquez

the-final-sentence:

the-final-sentence:

March 6 - Gabriel García Márquez

Bio:  Born on March 6, 1928, writer Gabriel García Márquez grew up listening to family tales. After college, he became a journalist. His work introduced readers to magical realism, which combines fact and fantasy. His novels Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude) and El amor en los tiempos del cólera (Love in the Time of Cholera) have drawn worldwide audiences. He won a Nobel Prize in 1982. [2]

Anecdotes:

  • The highly political Marquez has long been a friend of Cuban president Fidel Castro. [3]
  • He claims that he wrote the book “One Hundred Years of Solitude” barricaded in his study in Mexico, after receiving a vision. One day, while he and his wife and children were in their car driving to Acapulco, he saw that he “had to tell [his] story the way his grandmother used to tell hers, and that [he] was to start from that afternoon in which a father took his child to discover ice.” He made an abrupt U-turn on the highway, the car never made it to Acapulco, and he locked himself in his study. Fifteen months later, he emerged with the manuscript, only to meet his wife holding a stack of bills. They traded papers, and she put the manuscript in the mail to his publisher. [4]
  • He has a yellow rose or tulip on his writing desk each day. [5]
  • When he was diagnosed with lymphatic cancer, he gamely declared to the world that the disease was an “enormous stroke of luck” because it finally forced him to write his memoirs. [6]

Final sentences:

‘Forever,’ he said.

from Love in the Time of Cholera (translated by Edith Grossman)

[He stumbled on the last step, but he got up at once. “He even took care to brush off the dirt that was stuck to his guts,” my Aunt Wene told me.] Then he went into his house through the back door that had been open since six and fell on his face in the kitchen.

from Chronicle of a Death Foretold

[And she, with a sad smile—which was already a smile of surrender to the impossible, the unreachable—said: “Yet you won’t remember anything during the day.” And she put her hands back over the lamp, her features darkened by a bitter cloud.] “You’re the only man who doesn’t remember anything of what he’s dreamed after he wakes up.

from Eyes of a Blue Dog (short story)

Only then did she understand that three thousand years had passed since the day she had had a desire to eat the first orange.

from Eva is Inside Her Cat (short story)

Before reaching the final line, however, he had already understood that he would never leave that room, for it was foreseen that the city of mirrors (or mirages) would be wiped out by the wind and exiled from the memory of men at the precise moment when Aureliano Babilonia would finish deciphering the parchments, and that everything written on them was unrepeatable since time immemorial and forever more, because races condemned to one hundred years of solitude did not have a second opportunity on earth.

from One Hundred Years of Solitude

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

RIP Gabriel García Márquez

55 notes

230 Plays
Ludwig van Beethoven
Piano Sonata No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 27 No. 2 -''Moonlight'' - 1. Adagio sostenuto

karamazove:

Piano Sonata No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 27 No. 2 -”Moonlight” - 1. Adagio sostenuto — Ludwig van Beethoven

(Source: kx5991)